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Contents

About Wikipothesis websites

This website is composed of three separate sites: Wikipothesis, Wikipothesis Jump Nation, and Wikipothesis Jump Product. The site you’re on is indicated in the sidebar (located on the left side of this web page) and below the logo. The other sites can be accessed by clicking a link under "sister sites" in the sidebar.

For information about Wikipothesis’ goal and philosophy, click the Main page in the sidebar.

For information about Wikipothesis Jump Nation or Wikipothesis Jump Product, select a link under “sister sites” in the sidebar, which will default to that site’s Main page with information about that particular site.

Copyright

User-posted material is protected by the type of Creative Commons license shown in each site’s page footer. Creative Commons licenses retain the user’s copyright, but provide specified limited rights to use the material. For more information, please read the Terms of Service.

Before you post to this site, you must read and agree to the Terms of Service, which includes the Copyright information, Privacy Policy, and Disclaimer. The Terms of Service is also available as a link in the page footer (the terms are the same for all three sites). You must also read the Main page for the site where you would like to post.

Getting around the Wikipothesis websites

Sidebar

The sidebar (also called a menu bar) is the series of links on the left side of this web page. Each site has its own sidebar. The sidebar changes depending on whether you’re signed in and what type of page you’re viewing.

Links (hyperlinks)

Links are generally indicated by blue text and are not underlined. Creation of external links in a manner that would create a clickable link is blocked on this website. Internal links are allowed.

Language Links

The sidebar will display a language link if the page you are viewing has been translated. Each site’s Main page displays a link to all currently available languages to make it easy to navigate to another language’s site.

Topic pages (articles)

Topic pages are created by users. Each new topic page is a new article. Each topic page has associated discussion pages where users can debate and provide comment.

On Wikipothesis Jump Nation and Wikipothesis Jump Product, any user can edit the topic page. On Wikipothesis, only the user who created the topic page (and system administrators) can edit the page.

Search for a topic

There are two ways to search for content. First make sure you’re on the site you want to search; for instance, if you want to search for a topic in Wikipothesis, you must first be on that site.

Search field. To search for a topic, page title, or page content, enter the information in the search field, then click the magnifying glass or press Enter or Return on your keyboard.
Table of Contents. To search for a list of topic pages, click the Table of Contents in the sidebar. The Table of Contents shows a list of categories for that site. Click a category to see a list of topic pages in that category. Topic pages that haven’t yet been added to the Table of Contents will appear in “uncategorized pages,” which can be found in the sidebar under “Special pages.” A link to uncategorized pages also appears in the second paragraph in the Table of Contents.

Read a topic

When you find a topic that interests you, click the page title to view the page content.

Several tabs will appear alongside the topic page. See “All those page tabs” below for information about the tabs.

User account

Before you can create or edit a post, you must have a user account. You need to create only one user account to access all three Wikipothesis websites.

To create an account, click “create account” at the top right corner of this web page. A login page will appear. Click “Create an account.” Create a user name and password (the password must be at least seven characters long), then enter your e-mail address.

For your user name, don’t use a name or pseudonym that belongs to someone well known (unless that person is you), even if your name is the same, unless you add additional letters or numbers to distinguish yourself. You must not use the name of another person (even if not well known) to impersonate that person or cause confusion. Wikipothesis retains the right to delete user accounts that do not follow this rule.

After you submit your information, a confirmation will be sent to the e-mail address you registered. Be advised that a confirmation e-mail may take several minutes or longer to make its way to your e-mail inbox. To confirm your account, open the e-mail (make sure to check your spam folder) and click the link or paste the link into your browser’s address bar. The return address will show [email protected] If there is a change to this address, it will be noted here. Any other return address will be spam.

User preferences

After you create an account, you can select options for that account by clicking “My preferences” at the top of this web page (you must be logged in to see this option). Below is a short list of options available in your preferences page:

  • Enable e-mail from other users (selected by default)
  • Send me copies of e-mails I send to other users
  • E-mail me when a page on my watchlist is changed
  • E-mail me when my user talk page is changed (selected by default)
  • E-mail me also for minor edits of pages

Optional signature

When you post material to this site, you have the option to display a “signature” other than your user name. Signatures, unlike user names, can have spaces. To create a signature, click “My preferences” (visible after you’re logged in) at the top of this web page; scroll down to where it says “Signature” then enter a text signature in the text box. The signature may contain spaces and numbers. Your signature will become a link to your user page; to use a signature without a link, check the box below the signature box.

For your signature, don’t use a name or pseudonym that belongs to someone well known (unless that person is you), even if your name is the same, unless you add additional letters or numbers to distinguish yourself. You must not use the name of another person (even if not well known) to impersonate that person or cause confusion. Wikipothesis retains the right to delete user accounts that do not follow this rule.

User Page and user My Talk page (you have a mini blog!)

When you create an account, you’re provided a “User page” and “My talk” page.

User page

Think of your user page as your blog, Facebook, or MySpace page. Only you can edit you’re user page. To access your user page, click your user name at the top of this web page (you must be logged in).

My Talk (Comment) page

Your talk/comment page is editable by any logged-in user. Your talk/comment page can be used to interact with other users, especially if your comments don’t fit in a topic page or discussion page. If you have specific requirements for how your talk page should be used, write that information at the top of the page. To access your talk/comment page, click “My talk” at the top of the page. Your talk page is the “comment” tab next to your user page.

Find another user’s User Page or My Talk/Comment page

To locate another user’s user or talk page, click their user name or signature in a post or in a history page (which is a tab alongside a topic page), or go directly to the Active Users List page where you can click their user name. The Active Users List can also be found by clicking “Special pages” in the sidebar; a new page will appear where you can search for “Active users list” (under the “Users and rights” heading). A user’s talk page is the “comment” tab next to their user page

E-mail another user

To e-mail another user, go to their user page (see instructions above). Once you have accessed their user page; if the user has selected e-mail forwarding in their preferences, the option “E-mail this user” will appear as a link in the sidebar. E-mail is forwarded through Wikipothesis; you cannot view the other user’s e-mail address. However, the forwarded e-mail will reveal your Wikipothesis-registered e-mail address to the other user if they view the return address properties or if they click the reply button in their e-mail software.

All those page tabs

When you’re logged in and select a topic page to read or after you create a new topic page, several tabs will appear:

  • Topic page
  • Support (Wikipothesis only)
  • Refute (Wikipothesis only)
  • Comment (Wikipothesis only)
  • Discuss (Wikipothesis Jump Product & Jump Nation only)
  • Read
  • Edit
  • View History
  • WikiSysop--watch.gif (watch)
  • Create
  • Add Topic

Topic page

The topic page is the default tab and is where you read a topic.

On the Wikipothesis site, only the user who originated a particular topic page (or a system administrator) can edit that topic page. Other users can create or edit the topic page’s associated support, refute, and comment pages.

On the Wikipothesis Jump Nation and Jump Product sites, any user can edit a topic page created by another user.

Support tab (Wikipothesis only)

The support page is where users provide supporting arguments or evidence related to the topic page.

Refute tab (Wikipothesis only)

The refute page is where users provide refuting arguments or evidence related to the topic page. On the Wikipothesis site, users may suggest an experiment to help support or refute a hypothesis.

Comment tab (Wikipothesis only)

The comment page is where users add general comments that don’t fit into support, or refute pages.

Discuss tab (Wikipothesis Jump Product and Jump Nation only)

The discuss page is where users discuss or comment on the content of the topic page.

Read tab

The read page is where you read the topic page in WYSIWYG or “what you see is what you get” format.

Edit tab

The edit page is where you edit or modify text. The edit tab reflects the page you were viewing. For instance, to edit a comment page, first select the comment tab, then select the edit tab. To edit the topic page, first select the topic page tab, then select the edit tab (on the Wikipothesis site, only the original creator of a topic page or a site administrator can edit that topic page).

If you wonder why you read text in one tab but edit text in another tab, it’s because MediaWiki software doesn’t have a stable, internationalized read/write text editor. This site will eventually install a read/write editor when a stable version becomes available. In the meantime, when you click the edit tab, it shows the text that was on the page you were just viewing, as well as HTML and other special code that help format the text. If you’re new to HTML or wiki markup language, it may appear confusing. But you can still add your text or make your edits without knowing code. All you need to do is place your cursor where you want to insert text and start typing. The only thing you need to remember is that to create paragraph breaks, you need to add two returns instead of one, otherwise the paragraphs will run together and appear as one paragraph.

If the code makes it difficult to find the spot where you want to edit text or enter your comments, use your browser’s search feature as follows: In read mode, copy a few words of text that appear next to spot where you want to enter your text. Now click the edit tab then select the CTRL + F keys on your keyboard (or Command + F if you’re using a Mac). A text box will appear near the top of the page where you can paste the text you copied. Click “next.” The matching text will be highlighted on the screen. If you keep clicking Next, you’ll progress through the page, stopping on each instance of the text until you find the spot where you want to edit or enter text.

The edit page also has a simple formatting toolbar. To use the toolbar, select the text you want to format then click a toolbar button. If you want to add other formatting, see “Formatting & style” below. For an easy way to add a heading and text to a discussion page, use the Add Topic tab (see instructions below).

Add Topic tab (discussion pages only)

The Add Topic tab allows you to add a new heading and/or body text to a discussion page without having to use the edit tab. When you save the page, your heading and text will be inserted into the bottom of the page you had been viewing. You can later click the edit tab to move your text to where you would like it to be placed.

View History tab

The View History page reflects the page edit history of whatever page you were viewing. For instance, to view the edit history of a comment page, first select the comment tab, then select the View History tab. To view the edit history of a topic page, first select the topic page tab, then select the View History tab.

A new record is automatically created in the history page every time a user modifies a page and clicks the save button. The record includes the changes to the page, the user who edited the page, and a date/time stamp.

WikiSysop--watch.gif (watch) tab

The watch tab allows you to be notified if a particular topic page or any of its associated discussion pages have been modified. When you’re on a page you want to watch, simply click the watch tab. The topic page and all of its associated discussion pages will be added as a group to your watchlist.

Your watchlist (“My watchlist”) will appear as a link at the top of this web page (you must be logged in to see this link). To find out if any watched pages have been modified, click your watchlist. You can also select to be sent a notice by e-mail when someone edits a watched page. To enable this feature, go to “My preferences” at the top of this page (you must be logged in to see this link); scroll down to “E-mail options.” Place a check mark in the box next to the sentence that reads “E-mail me when a page on my watchlist is changed.”

Create tab

The create tab appears if no one has added any text to the page you are viewing. Simply enter text in the text box (or click the create tab and enter text) and save your post.

Show Preview and Show Changes buttons

Every time you save an edit, the change is saved in the history tab -- every single time. If you make six small changes and save after each one, the history tab will show six records. It’s best to save all of your edits just one time so that they all appear as one record in the history tab. You can see what your changes will look like before you save them by clicking the Show preview button (the button automatically appears at the bottom of the page when you edit a page); when you click Show preview the screen will be split and show the preview at the top of the page and the edit window below it. When you make additional edits, click Show preview again to refresh the preview. Another option is the Show changes button (not available in a Wikipothesis Author Comments section), which allows you to see the differences between the current version of the page and your edited version.

It’s good practice to select and copy your text before you click the save button or any preview button in case a system glitch loses your text; if you formatted your text, make sure to copy the text in the edit window to pick up the formatting code. Even better is to first copy and save your text offline.

Summary box

When you modify/edit a page, you should make a note or summary of the change by adding text in the Summary box. The box appears at the bottom of the page when you edit a page. The summary is a little description pointing out what was changed, such as "edited text" or "Deleted then summarized first three paragraphs." The summary gets stored alongside your edit, and allows people to track changes in the wiki without having to compare history pages to find out what was changed.

Join the discussion!

To join a discussion, you must be logged in. Users participate in a site by entering content into a topic page’s associated discussion pages, which appear as tabs next to the topic page. You can also edit topic pages in Wikipothesis Jump Nation and Wikipothesis Jump Product. Wikipothesis topic pages are editable only by the topic’s originator or system administrators.

After you click a topic page or an associated discussion page, note that an edit tab appears. The edit tab is where you add your comments or edit someone else’s comments. Don’t be confused! A different edit tab appears depending on whether you first selected a topic, support, refute, discuss, or comment tab. See All those page tabs above for instructions on how to add text to an edit page or how to quickly add text using the Add Topic page.

Start a new topic page

If you have an idea for a new topic on Wikipothesis, before you add it to this website, first find out if it’s already being discussed on this site or elsewhere on the Internet. Wikipothesis is for topics that haven’t been posted elsewhere on the Internet or in other media (exceptions are discussed in the Wikipothesis site’s Main page). Wikipothesis Jump Nation and Wikipothesis Jump Product are for any topic related to each site’s goal whether or not it’s already discussed elsewhere on the Internet or in other media.

Start a new topic page, as follows:

Figure out what title to use

The title of your topic page is what will appear under a Table of Contents category or subcategory. Your title should be brief, but indicate what the post is about and make it easy for others to quickly decide if they want to read your post.

The wiki software doesn’t allow more than one topic page with the same title within the same site – even if the page is under different Table of Contents categories. If the title is already taken, you’ll need to modify your title. You can also add additional text in parentheses at the end of the title to help distinguish your title from a similar title. The first character in your title will be converted to an upper case letter.

Note: For Wikipothesis Jump Nation, the Table of Contents already has a Nation Page category for each nation/territory. To create topic pages under a particular nation, add the nation’s abbreviation in parentheses at the end of the page title (the Tables of Contents lists the abbreviations you should use). For example, to create a topic page titled “Affordable Housing” under the United States category, you would write “Affordable Housing (USA)” as the page title. By including the nation’s abbreviation in parentheses after the title, every nation can create a page titled “Affordable Housing.”

Create the topic page

Once you have a title in mind, enter the title in the Search field and press Enter or Return on your keyboard. If a topic page with that title doesn’t already exist, you will be asked if you would like to create the page. Click "yes." The new topic page will appear. To save the page with that title, you must 1) add text to the page and 2) save the page. If you skip one of these steps, your page will not be saved.

Every time you click the save button, a version of your post is saved in the history tab. For instance, if you make six small edits and save after each, six records will be saved in the history page. You can use the preview button to view your post before saving it to prevent a long history file where everyone can see your mistakes. Be aware that the first time you click the save button, your post is viewable under a section called “uncategorized pages.” If you don’t want anyone to see your post until it’s ready, prepare the post offline then post it in its completed form before you click the save button; use the Show Preview button to view and modify your post’s format before you save the page.

Special instructions for the Wikipothesis site (not including sister sites)

For Wikipothesis topic pages (not including sister sites), only the originator of the page (or a system administrator) can edit the page. A Wikipothesis topic page is divided into two parts: initial post and Author Comments:

Initial post: Your initial post remains editable until you click the save button; once you click the save button, a timer begins allowing you 30 minutes to continue editing and saving your post, after which your post will be locked from further edits. After 27 minutes, you will receive a warning notifying you that your time is about to expire. Please immediately save your post. You then have three more minutes to edit and save additional edits. Your post will then be permanently locked from further edits.
Author Comments: You can add additional posts to the same page by using the Author Comments section of the page (this section will appear after you save your initial post). Each Author Comment also has a 30-minute limit to edit the post. The time starts when you click the save button the first time. Author Comments will appear below the initial post with the latest Author Comment at the top.
Each post will automatically be stamped with your user name (or signature)/date/time (reflected in Universal Time Code (UTC)/Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). The initial post will show the time of the first save. An Author Comment will show the time of the last save.

To edit the initial post, use the edit tab. To edit an Author Comment, click the edit link next to the comment. Remember that edits must be completed within the 30-minute time frame.

You should use the Author Comments section to modify your hypothesis and use the support, refute, and comment pages to debate your hypothesis. However, you may use the Author Comments section however you choose. But if you use Author Comments for every comment you’d like to make, it may grow very long on the page and readers may be reluctant to scroll through pages of comments to get to the essence of any modifications to your hypothesis.

Use easy-to-understand terms in your post

Remember that this website is intended for everyone. Your goal is to explain your idea (or hypothesis on the Wikipothesis site) so that the general public can understand and, hopefully, contribute or become interested enough to pursue study of the topic (pretend you are explaining your hypothesis to a friend who has no background in the subject matter). If you use terminology, please explain it in the most fundamental way you can manage. The easiest way to clearly convey your idea is to use descriptive wording instead of or along with terminology. If you find this difficult, then create two sections in your post – one for the general public followed by one for a more technical audience.

For the Wikipothesis site, summarize your hypothesis at the beginning of your post then elaborate and provide supporting evidence below the summary. Please use some means to separate your summary from your elaboration. For instance, you could use a horizontal line to separate your summary from your elaboration (horizontal line is available in the formatting toolbar in the edit page), or use headings (for example “Summary” and “Elaboration”).

Add a category to your topic page so that it can be found in the Table of Contents

After you create a new topic page, the page won’t appear in the Table of Contents until you indicate under which category/subcategory the page should be listed. This makes sense because the software itself has no idea. To make the process easy, a Category box appears on each topic page in read mode (you must be logged in to edit the Category box).

Note that categories and subcategories are created by users. When you follow the directions below to add you topic page to a category or subcategory, if the category/subcategory doesn’t yet exist, it will automatically be created in the Table of Contents.

Categories and subcategories may change over time as more pages are added to the Table of Contents and new or revised category names seem more useful. All users are invited to help keep the Table of Contents organized.

Add your topic page to a category as follows:

  1. Select which Table of Content category (or categories) your topic belongs to. Search the Table of Contents to see if your topic page fits into a particular category. To search for subcategories, click a category. Subcategories, if any, will be listed under that category.
  2. If you don’t find the appropriate category/subcategory. Follow the same instructions below for adding a category to your topic page. The new category will be added to the Table of Contents as a main category. If the new category should be a subcategory, follow instructions below to Convert a category to a subcategory.
  3. Add the category to your topic page. Scroll to near the bottom of your topic page where you will see a “Table of Contents category” box (the Category box appears only after text has been saved in the page). Click the + icon. A text box will appear where you can enter a category or subcategory name. Click OK. Your topic page will now be found in the Table of Contents under the category or subcategory you added to your topic page. You may list your topic page under more than one category/subcategory, but please use only the minimum number of categories/subcategories needed. You can always go back and add or remove categories from your page’s Category box.

If you don’t have Javascript enabled, you will need to manually create a category tag by entering the following code in the edit tab/edit link of your topic page:

[[category: category name goes here]]

Be sure to include the double brackets and colon after the word category. Enter the code at the bottom of the page to make it easy to find and to separate it from regular text. The category code is visible only in the edit tab; it will not appear when you read the page. You may add multiple category tags; each tag is separate and enclosed in double brackets.

Category and subcategory names must be unique

A category/subcategory name can be used only once on each site. If the name is already in use, you can create another category/subcategory with the same name by adding additional information in parentheses after the name. Names should be general so that numerous topic pages will fall under that category/subcategory.

The difference between a category page and a topic page

Categories are web pages. A category page looks similar to a topic page and that can lead to confusion. A category page can have the same title as a topic page, but will be prefaced with the word “category” – this designation is created automatically. A category page’s page title will automatically appear as a link in the Table of Contents. If you click the link, you are taken to that category page. The category page is automatically populated with a list of topic pages that have added that category to their Category box. A category page may also be populated with subcategories.

You can edit a category page as you would a topic page, but it should be to provide explanation or discussion about the category.

Move a category under another category to create a subcategory

To move a category under another category:

  • Open the category page you want to move
  • Scroll down to the page’s Category box
  • Add the higher-level category name to the box or create a new higher-level category name
  • The page will now appear as a subcategory under the higher-level category. When you click the subcategory, the title will still be prefaced with the word "Category," not "Subcategory"

The goal is to keep categories/subcategories to three levels so that users won’t have numerous categories to click to find your page.

Confused? Just remember that topic pages and category pages have Category boxes, but they have different purposes:

A topic page’s Category box is used to list your page in a Table of Contents category/subcategory.
A category page’s Category box is used to place the category under another category to make it a subcategory.

Where is my post!

When you create a new topic page, it won’t be listed in the Table of Contents until you select which category/categories your page should be listed under. This makes sense because the software itself has no idea.

If you added a category to your page, but it no longer appears in the Table of Contents, it may be that other users or system administrators modified the Category box to place your page in a more appropriate category; the category name itself may also have changed. Search for your topic page by entering the title, parts of the title, or direct excerpts of the page’s content in the search field (note that there is a separate search engine for Wikipothesis, Wikipothesis Jump Nation, and Wikipothesis Jump Product; you must first be on the correct site to search for your page).

If you didn’t add a category to your page: On the left side of this web page, under “toolbox,” click “Special pages.” A new web page will appear. Click “Uncategorized pages.” A new web page will appear that lists all uncategorized pages (pages that have not been added to any category). A link to uncategorized pages also appears in the second paragraph of the Table of Contents.

Once you find your page, please add a category or subcategory to your page’s Category box so that your topic will appear in the Table of Contents. See Add a category tag to your page so that it can be found in the Table of Contents for details.

Formatting & style

Sign a post

To quickly include your user name or signature in a page (and also create a link to your user page), place your cursor at the end of your post then click the signature button in the formatting toolbar, or type three tildes ~~~ at the end of your post. The three tildes ~~~ will convert to your user name or signature after you save the page or when you click page preview. To include a date/time stamp along with your signature, type four tildes instead of three. If you didn’t create a signature in you’re “My preferences” page, the tildes will convert to your user name instead of your signature.

For Wikipothesis topic pages, your user name and a date/time stamp are automatically added to your initial post and each Author Comment when you save the post. If you created a signature in My Preferences, your signature will appear instead of your user name.

For Wikipothesis discussion pages and Wikipothesis sister sites, you may add your user name or signature to comments you make to help distinguish who is saying what. But you should use your user name/signature for that purpose only, not to add your signature to every edit or general comment where it’s not important to show who made the comment or edit. The history page automatically retains the user name and date/time of all edits to a page. If desired, other users can refer to the history page to see who wrote what and when.

Insert an image into your post

To insert an image into your post, you 1) upload the image file into the images directory, then 2) insert a link to the image in your post. Each of the three sites has its own images directory. When you add a link to a post, the image must first be uploaded into that site’s images directory. Each language also has its own images directory for each site.

  1. Upload an image file (acceptable file types are png, gif, jpg, jpeg). The “Upload file” link is on the left side of this web page in the “toolbox” sidebar (you must be logged in to see this link). After you click the “Upload file” link, you will be taken to the upload file page:
    1. Browse to an image file on your computer by placing your cursor in the “Source file” text box and clicking Browse.
    2. Give the image a name by placing your cursor in the “Destination filename” text box. The image name does not have to be the same name as the image file on your computer. The name should represent the image; you must include the period and file type (.png, .gif, .jpg, .jpeg) after the file name. Do not use spaces in the file name; if needed, use a dash or underscore. You must remember this file name (including file type) to insert the image into your topic or discussion page. Please do not overwrite an image that has the same name. Instead, modify your file name so that it’s unique.
    3. To prevent another user from overwriting your file, precede the file name with your user name followed by two dashes. Example: if your user name is Tom1 and you want to name your file car.gif, you would write the following in the Destination filename: Tom1--car.gif. Currently, if you use this feature, the width must be 180px or less and you won’t be able to specify “thumb” or “thumbnail.”
    4. If you did not add your user name and dashes to protect the file from being overwritten, you can select to be notified if someone overwrites your file by clicking the “Watch this file” box near the bottom of the upload page.
    5. Upload the file to the database by clicking the ‘Upload file’ button near the bottom of the page.
    6. You can optionally add information about the image in the Summary field.
  2. Insert the image into your post. Once the file has been uploaded into the images directory, go back to the edit tab of the topic page or a discussion page. Place your cursor where you’d like to insert the image. Insert code to include the image on the page. The file name is case sensitive and must match the uploaded file name. Below are example of how to add the code and how to modify the image’s appearance on the page.

The formatting toolbar also has a button to help you insert an image. The insert image button is the white square with an image in the middle of the square; if you place your cursor over the button, it says “Embedded file.” When you click the button, code will be inserted into your page and the area where you need to enter your file name and file ending will be highlighted. To modify the image’s appearance, you will still need to add the below details manually.

Format the image

Options Example How it will appear
Insert the full-size version of the image directly into the page.

[[File:file_name.jpg]]

For instance, to insert an image named car.gif into your page, include the following code [[File:car.gif]]. Make sure to include the opening and closing double brackets, the word File, and the colon, along with the file name and extension.

If your image doesn’t appear, it may be because:

  1. The file name is case sensitive - it must match the uploaded file
  2. If a user name and two dashes were added to the file name to protect the file, they must also be added to the code that inserts the image.
[[File:recycle.gif]] Recycle.gif
It doesn’t matter which order you specify the below details so long as you start with the file name
and place a bar | between the details. The bar | is also called a vertical bar or pipe character; it is usually located above the return or enter key on your keyboard; the bar may appear broken in the middle.
Modify the image size

The code to the right inserts a 120-pixel-wide rendition of the image into the page.

Adjust the pixel (px) width to whatever you choose.

[[File:recycle.gif|120px]] Recycle.gif
Place the image in the left or right margin, or center the image between the margins

If you specify left or right, the image will be placed against the left or right page border and text will wrap around the image.

If you specify center, the image will be centered and text will not wrap around the image.

If you don’t specify left, right, or center, the image will float inline with the surrounding text.

[[File:recycle.gif|left]]

[[File:recycle.gif|right]]

[[File:recycle.gif|center]]

Recycle.gif
Recycle.gif
Recycle.gif
Insert a frame around the image with the caption inside the frame and a link to the file

Specifying thumb will:

  • place a frame around the image
  • place a link to the image file below the image (inside the frame)
  • if you also added a caption, it will be placed below the image (inside the frame)

If you specify thumb without also specifying pixel size, every user will see a different size image depending on the value they selected for thumbnail size in their "My preferences" Appearance tab. It’s advised that if you specify thumb that you also specify pixel size.

[[File:recycle.gif|thumb|70px|Recycle icon]]
Recycle icon
Add a light border around the image

A border is useful if your image has a lot of white space around the edges.

[[File:recycle.gif|border]] Recycle.gif
Add a caption

The caption will appear when a cursor hovers over the image; for thumbnail images, the caption will appear beneath the image.

[[File:recycle.gif|caption goes here]]

[[File:recycle.gif|thumb|70px|caption goes here]]

caption goes here
caption goes here
Insert a link to an image and its description without displaying the image or description on the page

[[:File:file_name.jpg]] Note the colon : before the word File. When you click the link, the image will appear along with its description. The only detail you may add is a caption; the caption will appear in place of the file name in the link.

[[:File:recycle.gif]]

[[:File:recycle.gif|recycle image]]

File:recycle.gif

recycle image

Description of image for visually impaired The alt command provides a description of the image for visually impaired readers using a text reader. The description may also appear if a user has images turned off in their browser.

[[File:recycle.gif|alt=Description of image goes here|Recycle image]]

Description of image goes here
Combine details

You can combine the above options as you choose. Just add a bar | between each option. For example, the code to the right would insert an image 60 pixels wide, with a border, in the right margin, and with a caption when you hover your cursor over the image. Obviously, you can’t indicate you want a thumbnail then also specify you want the image to be x-pixels wide – it has to be one or the other.

[[File:recycle.gif|60 px|border|right|recycle image]]
recycle image

Special wiki formatting

A format bar automatically appears when you’re in an edit page. The bar has several icons that allow you to select text then click "B" for bold, "I" for italics, etc. Below is a short list of the most commonly used code that you can manually add to an edit page. For a detailed list of formatting code, please refer to: http://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Help:Formatting. This link will take you to a page outside of this website.

As noted previously, Wikipothesis will eventually install a “What You See Is What You Get” (WISIWIG) editor so that you won’t need to know code – all the code will be hidden and you will be able to format text in the same page that you read.

Note: Use straight quotes " and not curly quotes “ when writing wiki markup language or HTML; if you use curly quotes, your code will not work. When you enter quotes in an edit page, they will be straight quotes.
Code Example of what the text looks like in the edit tab Example of what the text looks like in read mode

Paragraph spacing

Add two returns between paragraphs, otherwise they will run back-to-back.

First paragraph.
Second paragraph.


First paragraph.

Second paragraph.

First paragraph. Second paragraph.


First paragraph.

Second paragraph.

Heading level =

Place two equal signs == on both sides of a title for the second heading level (the first level is reserved for the page title).

For subsequent heading levels, continue adding an additional equal sign to both sides of the title up to six equal signs.

These headings are also used to create the Contents box (mini table of contents) that appears as a light gray box directly under a page title. The Contents box automatically appears after four headings have been created on a topic page or any of the discussion pages. The wiki software recognizes that the page is getting busy, so it creates a Contents box listing the headings as links to help the reader quickly navigate to a heading on the page.

For Wikipothesis topic pages, the initial post and each Author Comment will have its own contents box.

== second heading level ==

=== third heading level ===

==== fourth heading level ====

===== fifth heading level =====

====== sixth heading level ======

second heading level      

third heading level

fourth heading level

fifth heading level

sixth heading level

Indent :

To indent a paragraph, start the line with a colon :

To create deeper levels, add progressively more :

You can use a single return between indented items.

:Indent

::Deeper indent

:::Even deeper indent

Indent
Deeper indent
Even deeper indent

Numbered list #

To create a numbered list, add a number sign # at the beginning of each list item. The list will automatically be consecutively numbered. It will also be indented.

List items should be separated by a single return. To start a new list, add two returns between list items.

To create a numbered list with deeper indents, add progressively more #

#first item

#second item

#third item

(add a double space to restart list)

#first item for next list

##first indent level

##first indent level

###second indent level

  1. first item
  2. second item
  3. third item
  1. first item for next list
    1. first indent level
    2. first indent level
      1. second indent level

Bulleted list *

To create a bulleted list, start each line with an asterisk *

To create deeper levels, add progressively more *

You can use a single return between bulleted items.

*Bullet

*Bullet

**First indent level

***Second indent level

****Third indent level

  • Bullet
  • Bullet
    • First indent level
      • Second indent level
        • Third indent level

Horizontal rule ----

Use four dashes

Text here

----

Text here

Text here

Text here

Link to another topic page on the same site

Enclose the topic page title in two sets of brackets.

[[Topic page title goes here]] Topic page title goes here

(the page title will become a link)

Create an anchor to mark a spot on a page that you will link to

An anchor creates a spot on a page that you can link to from the same page or from a different page. Place the anchor above the spot you want to link to. Enclose the anchor name in quotes and div tags, including the < >. The anchor will not be visible in read mode.

<div id="NameOfAnchorHere"></div>

Link to an anchor on the same page

Start with a number sign # followed by the anchor name. Place a bar | after the anchor name followed by text that links to the anchor (in read mode, this text will turn blue, representing a link). Enclose the whole thing in two sets of brackets.

[[#NameOfAnchorHere|text included in the link goes here]]

Link to an anchor on another page in the same site

Follow directions above, but precede the number sign # with the page name where the anchor resides.

[[page title#NameOfAnchorHere|text enclosed by the link goes here]]

Link to pages on sister sites (Interwiki links)

To link to a page on a different Wikipothesis site, you will need to know the language prefix and website prefix.

Language prefix

For the English site, use “en” as the language prefix.

For other languages, the prefix can be found by clicking a page in that language; the language prefix will be displayed in the web address directly following http://

Website prefix

wp for Wikipothesis

jn for Wikipothesis Jump Nation

jp for Wikipothesis Jump Product


To create the link, write the language and website prefixes, a colon, and the page name. Enclose the whole thing in two sets of brackets.

Examples:

To link to a page named Cars on the English Wikipothesis site, you would write: [[enwp:Cars]]

To link to a page named Cars on the English Wikipothesis Jump Nation site, you would write: [[enjn:Cars]]

To link to a page named Cars on the English Wikipothesis Jump Product site, you would write: [[enjp:Cars]]

To link to a page named Cars on the Spanish Wikipothesis site, you would write: [[spwp:Cars]]

To link to a page named Cars on the Spanish Wikipothesis Jump Nation site, you would write: [[spjn:Cars]]

To link to a page named Cars on the Spanish Wikipothesis Jump Product site, you would write: [[spjp:Cars]]

Table of contents box (a page’s mini Table of Contents)

A Table of Contents box automatically appears on a topic page when four or more headings have been added to a page.

References/Citations

Note: Use straight quotes " not curly quotes “ when writing code; otherwise, the code will not work.

To create automated footnotes, you need to do two things (if you’ve used reference code in other wikis, please use the below format):

(1) Place the following code each place you want a footnote number to appear:

<ref name="place footnote name here" />

Where it says “place footnote name here” use whatever name you feel is appropriate. The name will be replaced with a footnote number. Why do you use a footnote name instead of a number? Because the footnotes are automated and based on the order of the footnote names. If footnoted text is rearranged, you don’t need to rearrange the numbers.

(2) Place the following code at the bottom of the page where you want the footnote references to appear:

<references>
<ref name="place footnote name here">Place reference details here</ref>
</references>

Note that even if you use the same reference more than once in the text, you need to add the reference details only once in the footnotes.

The outer code (i.e., <references> </references>) is used once and encloses the entire list of references from all users.

Cite reference details as you prefer.

It’s a good idea to use a heading (i.e., “Footnotes”) or horizontal line to separate the body text from the list of references at the bottom of the page.

This is a sentence that needs a reference.<ref name="Smith" />

This is a sentence that needs a reference.<ref name="John" />

This is a sentence that needs a reference.<ref name="Smith" />

<references>

<ref name="Smith">R. Smith, "Size of the Moon", Scientific American, 46 (April 1978): 44-6.</ref>

<ref name="John">L. John. ''The Sun''. Academic Press, (2008).</ref>

</references>

This is a sentence that needs a reference.<ref name="Smith" />

This is a sentence that needs a reference.<ref name="John" />

This is a sentence that needs a reference.<ref name="Smith" />

<references> <ref name="Smith">R. Smith, "Size of the Moon", Scientific American, 46 (April 1987): 44-6.</ref> <ref name="John">L. John. The Sun. Academic Press, (2004).</ref>

</references> 


(The footnotes are links to the footnote details. The superscripts and arrow in the reference details, are links to the text that contains those references.)

Tables

The table below summarizes the most commonly used wiki table code.

{| class="wikitable" Opening tag (placed at very beginning to start the table)
{| class="wikitable" width=xpx Table width in pixels (px); add to opening code.
{| class="wikitable" width=x% Table width as a percentage of screen size; add to opening code.
{| class="wikitable" align="x" Without align code, table is left aligned. Add the align code to the opening code to align the table to the right or center of the page. If text wraps around the table and looks messy, don’t use the align code and set the table width to 100% to prevent text wrap.
|+ Table caption goes here Table caption code is placed directly below opening code. The caption will appear above the table.
|- Table row. Start on a new line.
| Data cell text goes here A data cell follows the table row code |- and starts on a new line. For a table with several columns, repeat the data cell code | for each column; start each data cell on a new line.
! Data cell title text goes here Data cell title text will be formatted bold and the data cell will be formatted light gray. Use instead of a bar | to add special formatting to the cell.
align="center" or valign="right" By default, text is left-aligned in a data cell. Align code aligns all text in a row if placed after row code |-, or text in a data cell if placed after data cell code |. Text in a data cell title ! will be center-aligned; you can’t change that with the align code.
valign="top" or valign="bottom" By default, text is vertically centered in a data cell. Valign code aligns all text to the top or bottom of that row if placed after row code |-, or top or bottom of a data cell if placed after data cell code | or !.
colspan=x Merge data cells horizontally (x is number of cells to merge). Place after data cell code | or ! to merge consecutive data cells horizontally.
rowspan=x Merge data cells vertically (x is number of cells to merge). Place after data cell code | or ! to merge consecutive data cells vertically.
style="width: xpx;" Column width in pixels (px). Place after data cell code | to define the width of that column. You only need to define the column width once for each column.
style="width: x%;" Column width as a percentage of total table width (this will only work if you have defined the table width in the table opening code). Place after data cell code | to define the width of that column. You only need to define the column width once for each column.
| code here | Data cell text goes here If you add valign, align, colspan, or width code to a data cell, separate the code from table text by adding a bar | after the code followed by the table text.
! code here | Data cell text goes here If you add valign, colspan, or width code to a data cell title, separate the code from table text by adding a bar | after the code followed by the table text.
|} Closing tab (placed at very end to close the table); code must be on a new line.

Detailed explanation is provided below.

Opening and closing tags

To create a table, start with the basic opening and closing tags:

{| class="wikitable" 

|}

All text will be placed after the opening tag and before the closing tag.

Rows and data cells (columns)

Rows and data cells (columns) are written down the page, but will be converted when you preview or save the page.

A row begins with a bar then a dash on a blank line:

|-

A data cell is where you enter your table text; a data cell begins with a bar:

|

For a table with more than one column, add a new cell to represent each column in the row. Start each on a new line. For instance, a table with 1 row and 2 columns would be written:

{| class="wikitable" 

|-

|first data cell (column) text here

|second data cell (column) text here

|}

What it looks like:

first data cell (column) text here second data cell (column) text here

Remember, one |- represents one row. So a table with two rows and three columns would be written:

{| class="wikitable" 

|-

|Apples

|Oranges

|Strawberries

|-

|Grapefruit

|Pineapple

|Lemons

|}

What it looks like:

Apples Oranges Strawberries
Grapefruit Pineapple Lemons
Title text

Title text is automatically formatted with a bold font and the table cell will turn a light gray.

To create title text, use an exclamation ! at the beginning of each cell instead of a bar |. For instance, a row with three titles would be written:

{| class="wikitable" 

|-

!Apples

!Oranges

!Strawberries

|}

What it looks like:

Apples Oranges Strawberries
Align table/wrap text around table

When a table isn’t wide enough to fill the screen width, text may wrap around the table. How it looks is a bit unpredictable. If the text wrap looks okay, but you prefer the table to be centered or aligned to the right of the page (tables are left-aligned by default), use the align code on the same line as the table’s opening code:

{| class="wikitable" align=center 

or

{| class="wikitable" align=right

To prevent text from wrapping around the table, add width=100% to the table's opening code so that the table fills the width of the page.

Align text to the left or right edge of a cell

Text automatically aligns to the left edge of a table cell. To align text to the center or right edge of a single table cell, add the align="center" or align="right" code after the data cell bar | for that cell. Data cell titles are center aligned in the cell and can’t be changed. To align all the text in a table row to the center or right of the cells, add the align code after the table row symbol |- instead of the data cell.

Align text to the center of a single table cell:

| align="center" | Data cell text would go here

Place the align code after data cell code | to align only that cell’s text to the center or right of the cell.

Example:

{| class="wikitable" width="100%"
|- 
| Default is left-aligned
| align="right"| Aligned to right
| align="center" | Aligned to center
|}

What it looks like:

Default is left-aligned Aligned to right Aligned to center


Place the align code after row code |- to align all text in that row to the center or right of the cells.

|- align="right"

Example:

{| class="wikitable" width="100%" 
|- align="right"
| style="width:50%;" | Place the align code after the row symbol |- to align all text for that row to the center or right of the cell
| style="width:25%;" | All cells aligned right
| style="width:25%;" | All cells aligned right
|}

What it looks like:

Place the align code after the row symbol |- to align all text for that row to the center or right of the cell All cell text aligned right All cell text aligned right
Align text to the top or bottom of a cell

Text automatically aligns to the vertical center of table cells. To align text to the top or bottom of a single table cell, add the valign="top" or valign="bottom" code after the data cell bar | for that cell (you can also align a data cell title to the top or bottom of the cell, but the text will be centered in the cell). To align all the text in a table row to the top or bottom of the cells, add the valign code after the table row symbol |- instead of the data cell.

Align text to the top of a single table cell:

| valign="top" | Data cell text would go here

Place the valign code after data cell code | to align only that cell’s text to the top of the cell.

Example:

{| class="wikitable" width="100%"
|- 
| style="width:50%;" | A cell of text will align to the middle of the cell unless you specify that it should align to the top of the cell
| style="width:25%;" valign="top"| Aligned to top
| style="width:25%;" | Not aligned
|}

What it looks like:

A cell of text will align to the middle of the cell unless you specify that it should align to the top of the cell Aligned to top Not aligned

Place the valign code after row code |- to align all text in that row to the top of the cells.

|- valign="top"

Example:

{| class="wikitable" width="100%" 
|- valign="top"
| style="width:50%;" | Place the valign code after the row symbol |- to align all text for that row to the top of the cell
| style="width:25%;" | All cells aligned
| style="width:25%;" | All cells aligned
|}

What it looks like:

Place the valign code after the row symbol |- to align all text for that row to the top of the cell All cells aligned All cells aligned

Can you align all table text to the top by placing the align code in the table’s opening code? Unfortunately, no.

Table caption

Create a table caption by placing a bar | and plus sign + on a line directly after the table’s opening code, as follows:

{| class="wikitable"

|+ Table caption goes here

|-

|Apples

|Oranges

|Strawberries

|}

What it looks like:

Table caption goes here
Apples Oranges Strawberries
Merge cells horizontally

Merge cells across a row using the colspan code after data cell code (either | or !). If you use the colspan code after an !, the text that follows will be bold and the cell will be light gray. If you use it after a |, the text that follows will be normal text.

colspan=x

Replace the x with the number of cells that should be merged. For example:

{| class="wikitable" 

|-

!colspan=3|Fruit

|-

|Oranges

|Lemons

|Limes

|-

|colspan=2|Grapefruit

|Pineapple

|-

|Mango

|colspan=2|Kiwi

|}

What it looks like:

Fruit
Oranges Lemons Limes
Grapefruit Pineapple
Mango Kiwi
Merge cells vertically

Merge cells in a column using the rowspan code after data cell code (either | or !). If you use the rowspan code after an !, the text that follows will be bold and the cell will be light gray. If you use it after a |, the text that follows will be normal text.

rowspan=x

Replace the x with the number of cells that should be merged. For example:

{| class="wikitable" 

|-

!rowspan=2|Fruit

|Apples

|Oranges

|-

|Lemons

|Limes

|-

|Grapefruit

|Pineapple

|Mango

|}

What it looks like:

Fruit Apples Oranges
Lemons Limes
Grapefruit Pineapple Mango
Table width

Set the table width as the number of pixels or as the percentage of the visible screen. To set the width in pixels, add the following in the opening line of the table code:

width=xpx or width=x%

Replace x with the number of pixels.

The following example creates a table 500px wide (note that the individual columns will not automatically be uniform width; to set the width of each column, you will need to set the table width before settings column width):

{| class="wikitable" width=500px

|-

|Apples

|Strawberries

|Oranges

|}

What it looks like:

Apples Strawberries Oranges

Or set the width as a percentage of the width of the visible screen:

{| class="wikitable" width=80%

|-

|Apples

|Strawberries

|Oranges

|}

What it looks like:

Apples Strawberries Oranges
Column width

Define column width in pixels by placing the following code after a cell title ! or regular cell |

style="width: xpx;"

Example:

{| class="wikitable" 

|-

!style="width: 300px;" | Apples

!style="width: 150px;" | Oranges

!style="width: 50px;" | Strawberries

|}

What it looks like:

Apples Oranges Strawberries

As another example, to create three regular columns, each 100 pixels wide, followed by regular text, you would write:

{| class="wikitable"

|-

|style="width: 300px;"|Apples

|style="width: 150px;"|Oranges

|style="width: 50px;"|Strawberries

|}

What it looks like:

Apples Oranges Strawberries


You can also define column width as a percentage of the total table width; but to do this you must first define the table width at in the table’s opening code, as follows:

<pre>
{| class="wikitable" width=100%

|-

|style="width: 50%;"|Apples

|style="width: 25%;"|Oranges

|style="width: 25%;"|Strawberries

|}

What it looks like:

Apples Oranges Strawberries
Place more than one type of code in a data cell

If you add more than one type of code to a cell (e.g., valign, align, width, colspan) separate each code type with a space.

Add text to a data cell

If you add code to a data cell (e.g., valign, align, width, colspan) and also add table text to that cell, separate the code from the table text by placing a bar | after the last code.

Closing tab

The closing tag |} is on a line by itself and follows the last table row. The closing tag closes the table and is needed to make the table work.

Note: If the top of your table disappears when in read mode, add a line or more of text above the table. This issue may occur if you place a table at the top of a page.

Math

This site utilizes TeX to render math formulas. Formulas are generally enclosed in math tags <math> </math>. The edit toolbar has a math icon that quickly inserts the math tags. See http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Help:Formula and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:Displaying_a_formula for details.

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